Heroes & Monsters of Greek Myth by Evslin, Evslin, and Hoopes

Heroes & Monsters of Greek Myth by Bernard Evslin

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


This is a book I’ve had since I was a kid and it was one of my favorites. It was this book and it’s companion that introduced me to Greek Mythology.

If you know anything about Greek Mythology, then you know that the majority of the stories and quite adult with their antics. With this book, the stories are re-written in a way that either glosses over those antics, or just doesn’t include them. This doesn’t make the stories in anyway less than what they were, and the stories that were based on adult antics aren’t included.

I loved this book as a kid and read it several times, so my copy is pretty well worn and I had to be really careful with it. As an adult, I still enjoyed the stories, but noted the differences from the originals.



View all my reviews

Get it on Amazon.

The Forgotten Door by Alexander Key

The Forgotten Door by Alexander Key

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


This has to be a book that was my mother’s, it’s from the 60s. The pages are very crispy and brown now. I had to be careful while reading it.

This is a story that was born of the age of Science Fiction. A boy from another world falls through a forgotten door into our world of the 60s. The basic plot is the boy trying to get home and the family that tries to help him. Of course, not everything goes well as the community suddenly becomes very suspicious thanks to a few rotten apples.

I really liked the idea of reading an early example of science fiction, and this was an interesting one, even though it didn’t really depict our world in a favorable light.



View all my reviews

Get it on Amazon.

Garfield at Large: His First Book by Jim Davis

Garfield at Large: His First Book by Jim Davis

My rating: 3 of 5 stars


This is the original Garfield, and for long time fans you’ll know that he looked different in the early days and that Odie wasn’t always around.

It’s true! Garfield was a bit more chunky, and far lazier as there was no Odie to amuse himself with. He still loved lasagna and sleeping. This tells the story of how Odie ended up living with Jon and Garfield, and of Garfield’s beginnings.

I bought this back in high school, and have reread it a few times. I don’t tend to collect comic book collections, but this one is rather special.



View all my reviews

Get it on Amazon.

Stories of Fairies, Elves, and Little People by Francine L. Trevens

Stories of Fairies, Elves, and Little People by Francine L. Trevens

My rating: 5 of 5 stars


This is a book from my childhood that I do not remember at all. I know it’s mine since my mother wrote my name in the cover, but I have no memory of this book. So reading this time around was a whole new experience.

These are stories about forest folk, that explain why you never see one, why they live in forests, and what they like to do with their time. There are a few wholesome stories, like “there’s no place like home” stories and such too.

This is a book that I would love to read to my children. There are illustrations of the fairies, and all of the characters are just too sweet. I’m glad I found this book and that it is mine.



View all my reviews

Get it on Amazon.

Relax, You’re Going to Die by Tai Sheridan

Relax, You're Going to DieRelax, You’re Going to Die by Tai Sheridan

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

If you’ve been following my reviews of Tai Sheridan, this is the third of his little ebooks, and for once I believe I’ve read something in order!

Buddha in Blue Jeans tackles the concept of sitting quietly with yourself, followed by Secrets of True Happiness, which I believe if you sit quietly enough you’ll start to contemplate what true happiness actually means. Beyond that is the concept of life and death, which is what this book tackles.

In another series of chapter-like poems ( I think I have it right this time!) he walks through the connection between life and death, while we are living we are also dying, and touches every so slightly on the role that religion plays in life and death.

Buddhists believe in reincarnation, so there is a whisper of that within the poems, but there is also nature, our ego, and even the universe and cosmos to consider. There are many things going on with our dance from life to death to consider, and this little ebook takes you there.

Get it on Amazon

Secrets of True Happiness by Tai Sheridan

Secrets of True HappinessSecrets of True Happiness by Tai Sheridan

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Another, very short, ebook from the Buddhist author, Tai Sheridan. This one is a little less straight forward than the other book, Sitting Quietly. This is one is more about our outlook onto the world rather than just sitting in it.

Again, with short, poem-like chapters, the author works through some of our greatest fears (death, fear, anger) and puts forth experiencing aliveness and big love into ourselves in order to become truly happy. He also has a short verse on the cyclical nature of “wanting”.

To me, it feels like this book is a step beyond Sitting Quietly, a deeper dive into our thoughts and nature to find deeper meaning and emotion. Or it could be just an interesting little ebook to get you thinking again about life and the meaning of the universe.

Get it on Amazon

Buddha in Blue Jeans by Tai Sheridan

Buddha in Blue Jeans: An Extremely Short Simple Zen Guide to Sitting Quietly and Being BuddhaBuddha in Blue Jeans: An Extremely Short Simple Zen Guide to Sitting Quietly and Being Buddha by Tai Sheridan

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

The title is aptly descriptive, it is a short ebook. I think I read it in 15 minutes, but that’s not really the point of this book. This book is a lesson in sitting quietly with yourself, which is something many of us humans have trouble doing, myself included.

This book is separated into tiny, poem-like chapters, the first one essentially explaining the basics of sitting quietly. The rest of the chapters help you work through what happens when you sit quietly, what to do with those pesky emotions, a wandering mind, and existential crises.

It’s written by a Buddhist, but it is written in such a way as to be appropriate for all religions or lack thereof. Anyone could benefit from this and that’s essentially why the author wrote it!

Get it on Amazon

Put the Cat in the Oven Before You Describe the Kitchen by Jake Vander-Ark

Put the Cat In the Oven Before You Describe the Kitchen: A Concise, No-Bull Guide To Writing FictionPut the Cat In the Oven Before You Describe the Kitchen: A Concise, No-Bull Guide To Writing Fiction by Jake Vander-Ark

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I wouldn’t really call this a guide to writing, but I would call it a worthy read. The author puts forth some “rules” to writing, some basic, some more advanced. Most of the rules you’ll find in other writing books. I’ll give an example.

The first “rule” is: Show, don’t tell. Which is a universal tip for writing better. Showing your audience something is always more exciting than just having a character rattle off a monologue about his/her life. It goes on from there, with a few book recommendations and references to the author’s own work.

I also want to say, that it seems almost every author so far writes a book about writing to help promote their work. Just an observation here. It’s a pretty good book though, short and to the point, without a lot of self-promotion (it doesn’t go overboard).

Get it on Amazon

Wonder Woman by Nancy Holder

Wonder Woman: The Official Movie NovelizationWonder Woman: The Official Movie Novelization by Nancy Holder

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I have not watched the movie that this book is based on. Just so we’re clear where I’m starting from. Also, have not watched any other Wonder Woman movie or read any other book. In general you could say I’ve not had any exposure to Wonder Woman or her story. Now that that is out of the way…

I’m a super fan of Greek Mythology, and am interested in Wonder Woman’s backstory more than what she’s doing now. I don’t have to hand the story of Zeus and the Amazons, but I love the connection and origins.

It seems a little too neat that she surfaces during WWII. I guess I’m a little biased here because Captain America surfaced during WWII as well and having two superheroes being “born” at that time is just a little too coincidental and well, easy.

Apart from that, I do appreciate her attitude towards the humans. She’s a no nonsense lady. However, why do we need a love scene between her and Steve Trevor? It adds nothing to the story.

Anyway, I was pleasantly surprised enough that I may have to watch the movie now.

Get it on Amazon

Weekend Readathon for May 2020

readathon

What is a Readathon?

I found a topic on Goodreads that answered this question really well:

A readathon, for those of you that might be confused, is an event, usually with a time limit, where you set a certain goal you would like to reach. The goal of readathons is to help you read more during that time period than you would any other time.

For me it simply worked better to try a readathon on one of weekends off from work. A time to relax and be myself surround by my books. I didn’t have a complete goal in mind, mostly because I’ve never tried to do a readathon before and wasn’t sure what I would be able to accomplish. I guess you could say I had the basic goal of try my best and see where I end up.

SATURDAY:

I finished reading Wonder Woman by Nancy Holder throughout the morning and afternoon. I had started reading it previously, but had only read through the first chapter before setting it aside. It started pouring down rain by the afternoon, so I made myself a cuppa tea and sat by my bay window for the added ambiance.

That evening I picked up Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes and read until it was too dark for me to see anymore. Leviathan is a difficult read and any little bit I can get in is tremendous progress.

SUNDAY:

I was a bit lazy on Sunday, meaning I slept in and watching a bit of YouTube before rousing myself for more activity.  Which means I didn’t get to reading until the afternoon where I read through Put the Cat in the Oven Before You Describe the Kitchen by Jake Vander-Ark, and three ebooks by Tai Sheridan: Buddha in Blue Jeans, Secrets of True Happiness, and Relax, You’re Going to Die. I finished with another round from Leviathan, until is was time for supper.

RESULTS:

I rather enjoyed myself. Usually I just read during my breaks at work, or sometimes in the mornings when I’m not ready to be productive just yet. I never just decide that I’ll go read for an hour.

This weekend showed me that I am capable of making a good size dent in my TBR pile. I read a total of 5 complete books (even though 4 were short ebooks they still count!) and made progress on the monster of a book I’m still trying get through, Leviathan.

I have a feeling that I’ll be doing this again when next I get day or two off from work, and the housework isn’t piling up!

Keep reading little book worms!

 

What about you? Have you tried a readathon before? Do you set aside a specific time to read? Let me know about it in the comments!