F is for Fugitive by Sue Grafton

F is for FugitiveF is for Fugitive by Sue Grafton

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

It’s been an actual while since I’ve sat down to read a series, and I’ve since been back to my local library and they have the entire series (it sadly ends at Y). So now I kind of have to read it in order. Which means lots of reviews on the same topic, so to speak. I’m fairly certain I’ll run out of things to say apart from “I really liked it”. I do hope that’s not the case.

I will say that I pegged the culprit in this one fairly early on, but still wanted to see how Kinsey would figure it out. This is also the first book I got mad at. Like I put the book down and had to back away for a minute mad. Which is interesting in and of itself. Books that do that to me are few and far between, and this is the sixth in a series…so again interested to see if that happens again.

I’m just interested to see where things go from here, will there be another book to make me mad? Will I be able to predict the culprit in another book? Where does this series go from here?

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The Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy, 2016 by John Joseph Adams

The Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy, 2016The Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy, 2016 by John Joseph Adams

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This is a short story collection that encompasses many different types of science fiction and fantasy. There is a good amount of space stories to be sure, but they are all different too. I would not say that there are many traditional fantasy stories (nothing like Lord of the Rings), but there are good stories in their own rights.

I would have liked more traditional fantasy stories, as it did seem that most of them were sci-fi. There weren’t any elves, wizards, magic, or other fantastic creatures (though I did like the cats that were based on actual prehistoric cats so that could be a fantasy, but that was only one story).

Apart from that, all the stories made me think, inspired me, and were entertaining. It did take me a while to read this book, as it’s not a cohesive book. It’s 20 different stories, so I needed a break after awhile to clear my mind. Which says a lot about how interesting the stories are.

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7th Heaven by James Patterson

7th Heaven (Women's Murder Club, #7)7th Heaven by James Patterson

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I’ve been reading my way through this series (in order!) and have been enjoying it. This book is good too, but I’m picking up some themes…

One: there are two crimes that are solved every book, one for the cops, one for the lawyers. Two: one of the women is assaulted to some degree (Lindsay got shot in a previous book, another one died a couple books ago… you get the idea).

I don’t seem to mind this, even though it makes certain things a bit predictable. What’s not predictable is which woman will be assaulted, and how the crimes will eventually be resolved.

Case in point, this book’s court case wasn’t fully resolved. The characters will never know the true ending, the reader is let in on the plot though. And the assault on the woman? It wasn’t really connected to either case. The crime was resolved by a victim!

So yes, even though some plot points are getting predictable, the books are still enjoyable because there is still enough unpredictability to keep my interest.

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D is for Deadbeat by Sue Grafton

D Is For Deadbeat (Kinsey Millhone, #4)D Is For Deadbeat by Sue Grafton

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I’m beginning to see what my mom likes about this series. I’m sad that the author has passed and she never got to finish the series (I believe it stops with X).

Anyway, this is about “D” not “X”, lets not get ahead of ourselves. I’m not terribly happy with the ending of this one, but at least Kinsey didn’t have to shoot anyone this time. It was less violent than previous books, but still very dangerous.

I liked all the twists and turns this one had, all the interesting characters involved made for nice read. The characters definitely made the book this time.

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Done!: Finish Your Creative Project in One Month by A. P. Lambert

Done!: Finish Your Creative Project in One MonthDone!: Finish Your Creative Project in One Month by A. P. Lambert

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

This book is really good for motivation to get going on your creative project. There isn’t much for clear steps because it’s for a “creative project” which could be anything from building a table to knitting a sweater. However, I did say it was good for motivation.

The author puts for many ideas and suggestions for keeping you moving forward on whatever personal project you’re stuck on. Tips on staying focused, finding accountability, and keeping on track I’m finding helpful.

I believe I found this as a freebie on Amazon, so it’s worth a read if you’re stuck on a creative project, or even just a personal project.

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Hidden Jewel by V. C. Andrews

Hidden Jewel (Landry, #4)Hidden Jewel by V.C. Andrews

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Even though I read this one last instead of fourth, I don’t think it made a difference to the story line, much. It did provide a different perspective (Pearl’s) on the story line, where previously it was only Ruby’s. Which shed a different light on Ruby…and it wasn’t exactly a positive one.

I was glad that the main plot points had moved away from men and woman context that most of the plots so far were based on. I could also relate to Pearl’s personal relationship problems, and while that was a part of the plot, it was a small one.

Basically, I liked reading this, I liked the more traditional take on the transition of high school student after graduation, and the non-traditional (Ruby) parent issues, and somewhat traditional parent issues (Beau). By the end of the book it felt like Pearl had found her place and was happy there.

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Tarnished Gold by V. C. Andrews

Tarnished Gold (Landry, #5)Tarnished Gold by V.C. Andrews

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Ok so I’m reading slightly out of order again, but the last two books in the Landry series don’t follow Ruby’s storyline. This one follows Gabriel, her mother, the other one follows Pearl, her daughter.

Actually, I’m quite glad that the author chose to do a prequel book later, rather than sooner, because it gives the story more interest. Gabriel’s story really isn’t that interesting, but it is a bit more so because we already know about her daughter’s story. Hints about Gabriel’s upbringing are in the first three books so it’s nice to have things come full circle.

However, it’s not a need to read book. You can still enjoy Ruby’s journey without this one. However it does fill in the gaps about Gabriel’s life and the life Grandmere Catherine and Grandpere Jack had before Ruby came along.

All in all it’s a nice addition to the series.

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All That Glitters by V. C. Andrews

All That Glitters (Landry, #3)All That Glitters by V.C. Andrews

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

All I can think about after reading this book is all the death that has occurred in this series so far. I have been reading them in order, just so we’re all on the same page. So far the death count (just in the book timeline) is seven. Seven.

Basically Ruby’s family is dead.

It leaves me wondering where this series is going as there are two more books in the series and there aren’t that many characters left to kill off. At this point it seems that all the family drama is gone since there is no more family anymore!

I’m interested in the next book because of this turn of events…

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How to Write Science Fiction and Fantasy by Orson Scott Card

How to Write Science Fiction and FantasyHow to Write Science Fiction and Fantasy by Orson Scott Card

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Orson Scott Card is a sci-fi writer of some renown, Ender’s Game anyone? (I still need to read it, but I’ve heard of it.) And he wrote a book on writing speculative fiction. You could really apply it to writing in general, but there are a few chapters specifically on the genre of speculative fiction.

He discusses the origins of the genre, before delving in further to what defines the genre. What is the difference between fantasy and science fiction? Is there even a difference? Well, a very broad definition is if the world doesn’t look or function like ours it’s speculative. I also liked the chapter on putting together ideas. The process of writing, advice for those who want to write, and general advice for getting published.

It took me a couple of tries to finish this book. It is packed with information. It is a bit outdated as it was written in the 1990s, pre-internet era, so it doesn’t touch on ebooks at all, but I would still say it is worth reading for any serious writer. He talks about beta readers (and training them!), how to put ideas together and formulate a story, things that don’t change no matter what. If you read sci-fi or fantasy, this is a must read.

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The 6th Target by James Patterson

The 6th Target (Women's Murder Club, #6)The 6th Target by James Patterson

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

As the sixth book in this The Women’s Murder Club series, I’m beginning to see a bit of a pattern, but the plots are different enough to keep the book moving and not boring. I could have read this book in a day should I have wanted to. It kept my attention.

I don’t like that every other book or so one of the women gets shot/injured to the point where one has died and the others were in the hospital. I get that injuring your main characters makes for more dramatic plot points, but as this is a very long running series for Patterson, let’s cool it just a bit please?

On the other hand, I did enjoy the trials presented, Yuki’s character development, and Claire’s character development. What I didn’t like? Lindsay is suffering from hot woman syndrome “everybody wants me”. Yuck. Let’s cool that a bit too (and maybe it will happen in the next book!). The story left a bit of a cliff hanger, which isn’t an integral part of the book plot, but could affect the series as a whole. Interesting.

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